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Atomic Absorption

Atomic Absorption Testing Services

Flame Atomic Absorbance (FAA)

Flame Atomic Absorbance (FAA) relies on aspirating a sample and atomizing it in a flame.  A light beam from a lamp is directed through the flame and into a monochoromator which focuses the detector on the wavelength of maximum absorption of the element.  The amount of light absorbed by the flame is inversely proportional to the amount of that element in the sample.  Metal ion concentrations of unknown samples are determined by comparison to an external or internal calibration (method of standard addition) of the instrument.  The concentration of the metal(s) in the sample is typically expressed in terms of the original mass taken for the analysis (wt/wt).

Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorbance (GFAA)

Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorbance (GFAA) is similar to FAA in that it relies on atomic absorption to measure metal concentrations, but it differs in that it uses a furnace to atomize the sample, not a flame.  This technique offers the advantage of greater atomization of the sample, which affords either a lower detection limit (than conventional FAA) or the use of less sample.  Metal ion concentrations of unknown samples are determined by comparison to an external or internal calibration (method of standard addition) of the instrument.  The concentration of the metal(s) in the sample is typically expressed in terms of the original mass taken for the analysis (wt/wt).

Method Summary

Click below to view Galbraith's Method Summary for Atomic Absorption: ME-71-Method-Summary-for-AAS-39-elements